RSE

RSE- Relationships and Sex Education

Currently, PSHE (Personal, Social, Health Education) remains a non-statutory subject, and section 2.5 of the National Curriculum framework document states that:
‘All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice.’ However, from September 2020 Relationships Education will become statutory in Primary schools in England, with government guidance being offered during 2019 as to the expected content of this curriculum.
Currently, PSHE (Personal, Social, Health Education) remains a non-statutory subject, and section 2.5 of the National Curriculum framework document states that:
‘All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice.’

However, from September 2020 Relationships Education will become statutory in Primary schools in England, with government guidance being offered during 2019 as to the expected content of this curriculum.

Why is RSE needed?
• More than ever before, children are exposed to representations of sex and sexuality through the media/ social media and the social culture around them, so we need to present a balanced view of  RSE and help them to be discerning and stay safe.
• Research shows that most parents say they want the support of schools in providing RSE for their children.
• Surveys of children and young people, as well as Ofsted, have repeatedly said that RSE tends to be “too little, too late and too biological”.

What will my child actually be taught in Sex Education?
The ‘Changing Me’ unit is taught over a period of 6 weeks in the second half of the summer term. Each year group will be taught appropriate to their age and developmental stage. Please note: at no point will a child be taught something that is inappropriate; and if a question from a child arises and the teacher feels it would be inappropriate to answer, (for example, because of its mature or explicit nature), the child will be encouraged to ask his/her parents or carers at home, and the question will not be answered to the child or class if it is outside the remit of that year group’s programme.


Foundation  Growing up: how we have changed since we were babies
Year 1 Boys’ and girls’ bodies; naming body parts
Year 2 Boys’ and girls’ bodies; body parts and respecting privacy (which parts of the body are private and why this is)
Year 3 How babies grow and how boys’ and girls’ bodies change as they grow older
Year 4 Internal and external reproductive body parts, body changes in girls and menstruation
Year 5 Puberty for boys and girls, and conception
Year 6 Puberty for boys and girls and understanding conception to birth of a baby.

 


All lessons are taught using simple, child-friendly language and pictures, which help children understand changes more effectively.
The key concepts that children learn in Jigsaw are inner strength, self-esteem and resilience. These are really important as they help keep children safe and it helps them make healthy decisions later in life.
Accurate information is important but only part of the picture: help them now by building their inner resilience, so they become mindful children, mindful teenagers, and mindful adults.

In line with the equality Act, we ensure children are not discimminated against and have an awarenss of the LGBTQ community.

Please read the leaflets and see school to ask questions. There will be a parent RSE workshop to share material and ensure everyone is happy with the scheme, in the Spring term. We will not teach sex education from the jigsaw scheme without consulation with parents first, and we will be tailoring the Changing me section to meet the needs of our children.

Files to Download

St Peters C of E Primary School, Birley St, Newton-le-Willows, WA12 9UR